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Well-Being Respiration : This biocompatible complex is comprised of a synergy of plants contributing to the well-being of the respiratory system....

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Eucalyptus

What is Eucalyptus?

Eucalyptus is a tree. The dried leaves and oil are used to make medicine. Though eucalyptus is used medicinally for many purposes.
 
Eucalyptus leaf is used for infections, fever, upset stomach, and to help loosen coughs. The leaf is also used for treating respiratory tract infections, whooping cough, asthma, pulmonary tuberculosis, osteoarthritis, joint pain (rheumatism), acne, wounds, poorly healing ulcers, burns, bacterial dysentery, ringworms, liver and gallbladder problems, loss of appetite, and cancer.
 
The effects of eucalyptus on the respiratory system complement each other wonderfully, its main component being an essential oil (Eucalyptol). Eucalyptus therefore has mucolytic properties, i.e. it fluidifies pulmonary secretions and thus facilitates their evacuation. It therefore helps to soothe coughs. The second major property for which eucalyptus is recognized is that it is a good natural antiseptic for the airways. 
 
Eucalyptus oil should not be taken by mouth or applied to the skin full-strength. It must be diluted for safety. The diluted oil is taken by mouth for pain and swelling (inflammation) of respiratory tract mucous membranes, coughs, bronchitis, sinus pain and inflammation, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and respiratory infections. It is also used as an expectorant to loosen coughs, antiseptic, fever reducer, and in vaporizer fluids. Other uses include treatment of wounds, burns, ulcers, and cancer.
 
Diluted eucalyptus oil is applied directly to the skin for pain and swelling of respiratory tract mucous membranes, joint pain, genital herpes, and nasal stuffiness. It is also used as an insect repellent.
 
In dentistry, eucalyptus oil is included in products used as sealers and solvents for root canal fillings.
 
In foods, dried eucalyptus leaf is used as a flavoring agent.
 
In manufacturing, eucalyptus oil is used as a fragrance in perfumes and cosmetics. It is also used as a mouthwash, antiseptic, liniment and ointment, and in toothpaste, cough drops, and gum lozenges.
 
Asthma. Developing research suggests that eucalyptol, a chemical found in eucalyptus oil, might be able to break up mucous. Some people with severe asthma have been able to lower their dosage of steroid medications if they take eucalyptol. But don’t try this without your healthcare provider’s advice and monitoring.
Reducing swelling (inflammation) of the upper airway tract.
Stuffy nose.
 
How does it work?
 
Eucalyptus leaf contains chemicals that might help control blood sugar. It also contains chemicals that might have activity against bacteria and fungi. Eucalyptus oil contains chemicals that might help pain and inflammation. It might also block chemicals that cause asthma.
 
Other names
 
Blue Gum, Blue Mallee, Blue Mallee Oil, Eucalipto, Eucalypti Folium, Eucalyptol, Eucalyptol Oil, Eucalyptus blatter, Eucalyptus bicostata, Eucalyptus essential oil, Eucalyptus oil, Eucalyptus fructicetorum, Eucalyptus globulus, Eucalyptus leaf, Eucalyptus odorata, Eucalyptus oil, Eucalyptus polybractea, Eucalyptus smithii, Fever Tree, Fieberbaumblatter, Gully Gum, Gully Gum Oil, Gum Tree, Red Gum, Stringy Bark Tree, Sugandhapatra, Tailapatra, Tasmanian Blue Gum.
 
Eucalyptus
 
The eucalyptus tree is a large, fast-growing evergreen that is native to Australia and Tasmania. The tree can grow to 375-480 feet (125-160 meters). Eucalyptus belongs to the myrtle (Myrtaceae) family. There are more than 300 species of eucalyptus, and Eucalyptus globulus is the most well-known species. One species (E. amygdalin) is the tallest tree known in the world. The tree grows best in areas with an average temperature of 60°F (15°C).
 
Eucalyptus trees constitute over 75% of the tree population of Australia. The eucalyptus tree is also known in Australia as the blue gum tree or malee. Other names for eucalyptus include Australian fever tree and stringy bark tree. The name is actually derived from the Greek word "eucalyptos," which means "well covered," and refers to the cuplike membrane that covers the budding flowers of the tree.
 
The bluish green leaves carry the medicinal properties of the tree and grow to a length of 6-12 inches (15-30 cm). While the leathery leaves are the sole food for koala bears, the leaves also contain a fragrant volatile oil that has antiseptic,expectorant, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, deodorant, diuretic, andantispasmodic properties. Other constituents of the leaves include tannins, phenolic acids, flavonoids (eucalyptin, hyperin, hyperoside, quercitin, quercitrin, rutin), sesquiterpenes, aldehydes, and ketones.
 
Eucalyptus oil is obtained through a steam distillation process that removes the oil from the fresh, mature leaves and branch tips of older trees. Approximately 25 species of eucalyptus trees in Australia are grown for their oil.
 
There are three grades of eucalyptus oil: medicinal, which contains the compound eucalyptol (also called cineol); industrial, in which a component of the oil is used in mining operations; and aromatic, which is used in perfumes and fragrant soap products. These oils vary greatly in character. When choosing an oil for therapeutic use, it is important to know from what species the oil was derived. Species used medicinally include E. globulus, which contains up to 70% eucalyptol; E. polybractea, which contains 85% eucalyptol; and E. Smithii. Eucalpytus amygdalinaand E. dives contain little eucalyptol and are used to separate metallic sulfides from ores in the mining industry. Eucalyptus citriodora contains a lemon-scented oil and is an ingredient in perfumes, as is E. odorata and E. Sturtiana. Two species, E. dives and E. radiata, have oils with a strong peppermint odor.
 
The most common species grown for its medicinal oil is Eucalyptus globulus. The eucalyptol found in this species is a chief ingredient in many over-the-counter cold and cough remedies, such as cough lozenges, chest rubs, and decongestants. It acts to stimulate blood flow and protects against infection and germs. The British Pharmocopoeia requires that commercial eucalyptus oils contain 55% eucalyptol by volume.
 
Origins
 
The Australian aborigines have used eucalyptus for hundreds of years as a remedy for fever, wounds, coughs, asthma, and joint pain. Australian settlers named the eucalyptus the fever tree because of its disease-fighting properties. Baron Ferdinand von Miller, a German botanist and explorer, was responsible for making the properties of eucalyptus known to the world in the mid-1800s. Likening eucalyptus' scent to that of cajaput oil (a disinfectant), von Miller suggested that eucalyptus might also be used as a disinfectant in fever districts. Seeds of the tree were sent to Algiers, France and planted. The trees thrived and, because of the drying action of the roots, turned one of the marshiest areas of Algiers into a dry and healthy environment, thereby driving away malaria-carrying mosquitoes. Eucalyptus trees were then planted in temperate areas around the world to prevent malaria. As a result, eucalyptus trees are now cultivated in China, India, Portugal, Spain, Egypt, South and North Africa, Algeria, South America, and in the southern portion of the United States.
 
Commercial production of eucalyptus began in Victoria, Australia in 1860. The nineteenth century eclectic doctors adopted eucalyptus as a treatment for fevers,laryngitis, asthma, chronic bronchitis, whooping cough, gonorrhea, ulcers,gangrenous tissue, edema, and gastrointestinal disturbances. European doctors used eucalyptus oil to sterilize their surgical and medical equipment. Eucalyptus leaves were often made into cigars or cigarettes and smoked to relieve asthma and bronchial congestion.
 
Modern medicines around the world have included eucalyptus in their practices. Indian ayurvedics use eucalyptus to treat headaches resulting from colds. Eucalyptus is listed in the Indian Pharmacopoeia as an expectorant and in theChinese Pharmacopoeia as a skin irritant used in nerve pain. In France, eucalyptus leaves are applied topically to relieve congestion from colds and to treat acutebronchial disease. A standardized eucalyptus tea is licensed in Germany to treatbronchitis and throat inflammations. Eucalyptus is also an ingredient in German herbal cough preparations. The German Commission E has approved the internal use of eucalyptus to treat congestion of the respiratory tract, and the external use to treat rheumatic complaints. In the United States, eucalyptus is a component of many decongestant and expectorating cough and cold remedies, such as cough drops, cough syrups, and vapor baths. Eucalyptus is often used in veterinary medicine. It is used to treat horses with flu, dogs with distemper, and to treat parasitic skin conditions.
 
General use
 
Eucalyptus is most popular for its ability to clear congestion due to colds, coughs, flu, asthma, and sinusitis. The tannins found in eucalyptus have astringent properties that reduce mucous membrane inflammation of the upper respiratory tract. Eucalyptol, the chemical component of the oil, works to loosen phlegm. Cough drops containing eucalyptus promote saliva production, which increases swallowing and lessens the coughing impulse. Earaches can also be treated with eucalyptus. When inhaled, the eucalyptus fumes open the eustachian tubes, draining fluids and relieving pressure. Eucalyptus enhances breathing, which makes it an effective remedy for asthma, bronchitis, sinusitis, whooping cough, and colds.
 
Eucalyptus is a component of many topical arthritis creams and analgesicointments. When applied to the skin, eucalyptus stimulates blood flow and creates a warm feeling to the area, relieving pain in muscles and joints.
The oil extracted from the eucalyptus leaf has powerful antiseptic, deodorizing, and antibacterial properties. It is especially effective in killing several strains ofStaphylococcus bacteria. A mixture of 2% eucalyptus oil evaporated in an aroma lamp has been shown to destroy 70% of the Staphylococcus bacteria in the affected room. When the oil is applied to cuts, scrapes, and other minor wounds, it inhibitsinfections and viruses. A 2002 report out of Australia made researchers around the world take note when two cases of patients with staph infections resistant to traditional antibiotic therapy responded to a mixture of eucalyptus leaf oil abstract.
 
The Australian researchers recommended formal clinical trials to test the therapy, based on an ancient aboriginal remedy. Eucalyptus also fights plaque-forming bacteria and is used to treat gum disease and gingivitis.
In large doses, the oil can be a kidney irritant and can induce excretion of bodily fluids and waste products. Eucalyptus oil added to water may be gargled to relievesore throat pain or used as a mouthwash to heal mouth sores or gum disorders. Consequently, eucalyptus is an ingredient in many commercial mouthwashes.
 
Eucalyptus' pain-relieving properties make it a good remedy for muscle tension. One study showed that a mixture of eucalyptus, peppermint, and ethanol oils successfully relieved headache-related muscle tension.
Eucalyptus may lower blood sugar levels. Placing a drop of the oil on the tongue may reduce nausea. The oil has also been used to kill dust mites and fleas.
Eucalyptus oil is one of the most well-known fragrances in aromatherapy. Two species of eucalyptus are used in aromatherapy oils: E. globulus and E. citriodora. The essential oil of eucalyptus is used to relieve cramps, cleanse the blood, heal wounds, disinfect the air, and to treat conditions such as asthma, bronchitis, throat and sinus infections, fevers, kidney infections, rheumatism, bladder infections, and sore muscles.
 
The essential oil can be diluted and added to a massage oil to ease aching muscles. The oil can be added to hot water and inhaled to reduce nasal congestion. It can also be diffused in the room of a sick patient to disinfect the air.
 
Some believe that inhaling the diffused oil can enhance concentration and thought processes. Studies have shown that inhalation of the cineole compound of eucalyptus stimulates coordination and motor activities in mice. Eucalyptus oil may also uplift the spirit during times of emotional overload or general sluggishness.
Applying a diluted oil to the skin instead of inhaling it increases the rate of absorption into the blood. Often the speed with which it is absorbed is so fast, the odor can be detected on the breath within minutes.
The oil is also an effective febrifuge, and a cold compress with eucalyptus oil added to it has a cooling effect that is useful in helping to reduce a fever. The essential oil of eucalyptus is also used to treat wounds, herpes simplex virus, skin ulcers, andacne. Combined with water, the oil makes an effective insect repellant. Because of its skin-moistening properties, the oil is often an ingredient in dandruff shampoo.
 
Eucalyptus oil may be combined with other oils that have similar properties, such as niaouli, pine, Swiss pine, hyssop, and thyme oils. It also mixes well with lemon, verbena, balm, and lavender oils.
 
http://www.organicfacts.net/organic-oils/natural-essential-oils/health-benefits-of-eucalyptus-essential-oil.html
 
The health benefits of eucalyptus oil are well-known and wide ranging, and its properties include anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, decongestant, deodorant, antiseptic, antibacterial, stimulating, and other medicinal qualities. Eucalyptus essential oil is colorless and has a distinctive taste and odor.
Though eucalyptus essential oil has most of the properties of a typical volatile oil, it’s not very popular as an aromatherapy oil because little was known about it until recent centuries, rather than the more ancient aromatherapy substances. The numerous health benefits of eucalyptus oil have attracted the attention of the entire world, and it has stimulated a great deal of exploration into its usage in aromatherapy as well as in conventional medicine.
 
Eucalyptus essential oil is obtained from fresh leaves of the tall, evergreen eucalyptus tree. The tree, scientifically classified as Eucalyptus Globulus is also known as fever tree, blue gum tree or stringy bark tree, depending on where it is located in the world.
 
Eucalyptus is native to Australia and has spread in the past few centuries to other parts of the world including India, Europe and South Africa. Though many countries produce eucalyptus oil in small quantities, the prime source of eucalyptus oil for the world is still Australia.
 
Due to the medicinal uses of eucalyptus oil and the compound eucalyptol which is present in it’s makeup, it is used in a variety of over the counter drugs including rubs, inhalers, liniments, rash creams, and mouthwashes.
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Health benefits of eucalyptus oil
 
The health benefits of eucalyptus oil include the following:
 
Respiratory problems: Eucalyptus essential oil is effective for treating a number of respiratory problems including cold, cough, runny nose, sore throat, asthma, nasal congestion, bronchitis and sinusitis. Eucalyptus oil is antibacterial, antifungal, antimicrobial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory and decongestant in nature, which makes it a good ingredient in many medicines that treat respiratory problems. A study published in Laryngoscope in 2004 shows its usefulness in treating non-bacterial sinusitis. Patients suffering from non-bacterial sinusitis showed faster improvement when given medicine containing eucalyptus oil. Gargles of eucalyptus oil mixed with warm water are consistently effective in treating sore throats.
 
Asthma is a condition that affects millions of people around the world, and there are many known treatments for the condition. One of these is the use of eucalyptus essential oil. Simply massage 1-3 drops onto the chest and the soothing effect of the aroma and vapors will calm the throat and dilate the blood vessels, which will allow more oxygen into the lungs and normal breathing can be achieved. The anti-inflammatory properties of eucalyptus essential oil also come into play in using it to get relief from asthmatic symptoms.
 
Wounds: Eucalyptus essential oil has antiseptic qualities because of its germicidal quality. Upon exposure to air, ozone is formed which is a well-researched antiseptic. Therefore, eucalyptus oil is used for healing wounds, ulcers, burns, cuts, abrasions and sores. It is also an effective salve for insect bites and stings. Furthermore, besides soothing the affected area, it also protects the open wound or irritated area from developing infections from microbial activity and exposure to the air.
 
Muscle pain: If you are experiencing joint and muscle pain, massaging eucalyptus oil on the surface of the skin helps to relieve stress and pain. The volatile eucalyptus oil is analgesic and anti-inflammatory in nature. Therefore it is often recommended to patients suffering from rheumatism, lumbago, sprained ligaments and tendons, stiff muscles, aches, fibrosis and even nerve pain. The oil should be massaged in a circular motion on the affected areas of the body.
 
Mental exhaustion: One very important reason that many people use eucalyptus oil is that it creates a cooling and refreshing effect. Normally, people suffering from certain conditions and disorders are slightly sluggish. Eucalyptus oil, a stimulant, removes exhaustion and mental sluggishness and rejuvenates the spirits of the sick. It can also be effective in the treatment of stress and mental disorders.
Aside from mental exhaustion, eucalyptus essential oil is commonly used to stimulate mental activity and increase blood flow to the brain. Since the essential oil is considered avasodilator by many, it means that it increases the blood flow around the body by relaxing the blood vessels and allowing more blood to circulate. Basically, more blood to the brain means more brain power, and eucalyptus essential oil is commonly employed in classrooms as a form of causal aromatherapy to increase student performance. Further, formal research must be done in this area, but all signs point to the positive correlation between brain function and eucalyptus essential oil.
 
Dental care: Eucalyptus essential oil is very effective against cavities, dental plaque, gingivitis and other dental infections owing to its germicidal properties. This is why eucalyptus essential oil is so commonly found as an active ingredient in mouthwash, toothpaste, and other dental hygiene products.
 
Lice: Due to its well-known qualities as a bug repellent and natural pesticide, it is frequently used as a natural treatment of lice. Some of the mainstream treatments of lice can be very severe and damaging to the hair, as well as packed with dangerous chemicals that you don’t want being absorbed into your skin, so combing a few drops of eucalyptus oil through a lice-infested head is a much better and healthier solution.
 
Skin care: Eucalyptus oil is often applied topically to treat skin infections.
 
Diabetes: When ingested, eucalyptus oil can help control blood sugar. Its properties as a vasodilator, mentioned above, mean that the entire body benefits from the increase in blood circulation. Diabetic patients commonly suffer from lack of good circulation, and it can be very dangerous, even resulting in amputation or death. Therefore, it is a good idea to frequently massage eucalyptus oil onto the skin topically, and also inhale it as a vapor to ease the constriction of the blood vessels. For best results, massage it onto the skin after a show, which also has vasodilating and relaxing qualities that will benefit diabetics.
 
Fever: Eucalyptus oil is also used for treating fever and reducing body temperature. This is why one of the common names of eucalyptus oil is “fever oil”. It works well when combined with peppermint oil and sprayed on the body as a mixture of a deodorant and a temperature reducer.
Intestinal germs: Eucalyptus oil is a vermifuge and is frequently employed to remove germs in the intestine. Studies have shown that ingesting eucalyptus oil can deter many of the bacterial, microbial, and parasitic conditions that arise in the various parts of the body, particularly susceptible areas like the colon and intestine.
 
 
Other benefits of eucalyptus oil include the following:
 
Room freshener: The antiseptic and deodorant nature of eucalyptus oil makes it a perfect room freshener for hospitals. It also kills bacteria and germs in the air, keeping the environment of the rooms clean and sterilized.
 
Soaps: Eucalyptus oil is frequently used in soaps, detergents and household cleaners. This is primarily due to its pleasant aroma and effect as a deodorant, antibacterial, antiseptic, and antimicrobial agent.
 
Tuberculosis and Pneumonia: Eucalyptus essential oil has plenty of antibacterial and antiseptic qualities, and when massaged onto the chest and used as a vapor rub or inhalant, it can relieve the signs and symptoms of harmful conditions like tuberculosis by clearing the lungs and reducing inflammation. It is best if applied to both the chest and the back, over the area of the lungs.
 
Mouth wash: As mentioned above, the oil is a fundamental ingredient in many mouthwashes and toothpastes. There have been a significant number of studies done on the antimicrobial qualities of essential oils.
 
Eucalyptus essential oil has been shown to protect against microbial growth that can promote a host of different symptoms and diseases in the body.
 
Sauna: Many people add eucalyptus oil to baths, spas and saunas because of its refreshing and antiseptic attributes. Most of the benefits of eucalyptus essential oil can be accessed through the vapor, as well as topical application or ingestion. Therefore, it is commonly used inaromatherapy, which is frequently included in spa treatment packages.
 
There are many less-researched areas of application for eucalyptus oil, and they should be studied more in the future before trusting them as completely effective treatments, but early testimonials seem to speak highly of its ability. It can be applied as a treatment for hayfever (seasonal allergy), acne, endometriosis, and herpes simplex virus.
 
Usage of eucalyptus oil in aromatherapy is gradually growing in popularity because it blends well with many other essential oils including the essential oils of thyme, rosemary, marjoram, lavender, cedarwood, and frankincense.
 
There are some dangers of taking too much eucalyptus oil, because when taken in large quantities, eucalyptus oil can be toxic. It may also interfere with other homeopathic treatments. Also, for certain people with allergic sensitivities, eucalyptus essential oil might be cause airborne contact dermatitis, which can be very uncomfortable, or even dangerous. Before beginning any new intensive alternative medical treatment, consult your doctor for advice, or an allergy test.
 
References
 
Swanston-Flatt SK, Day C, Bailey CJ, Flatt PR. Traditional plant treatments for diabetes. Studies in normal and streptozotocin diabetic mice. Diabetologia 1990;33:462-4.
Vigo E, Cepeda A, Gualillo O, Perez-Fernandez R. In-vitro anti-inflammatory effect of Eucalyptus globulus and Thymus vulgaris: nitric oxide inhibition in J774A.1 murine macrophages. J Pharm Pharmacol 2004;56:257-63.
Whitman BW, Ghazizadeh H. Eucalyptus oil: therapeutic and toxic aspects of pharmacology in humans and animals. J Paediatr Child Health 1994;30:190-1.
Juergens UR, Dethlefsen U, Steinkamp G, et al. Anti-inflammatory activity of 1.8-cineol (eucalyptol) in bronchial asthma: a double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Respir Med 2003;97:250-6.
Gray AM, Flatt PR. Antihyperglycemic actions of Eucalyptus globulus (Eucalyptus) are associated with pancreatic and extra-pancreatic effects in mice. J Nutr 1998;128:2319-23.
Takahashi T, Kokubo R, Sakaino M. Antimicrobial activities of eucalyptus leaf extracts and flavonoids from Eucalyptus maculata. Lett Appl Microbiol 2004;39:60-4.
Darben T, Cominos B, Lee CT. Topical eucalyptus oil poisoning. Australas J Dermatol 1998;39:265-7.
Burkhard PR, Burkhardt K, Haenggeli CA, Landis T. Plant-induced seizures: reappearance of an old problem. J Neurol 1999;246:667-70.
De Vincenzi M, Silano M, De Vincenzi A, et al. Constituents of aromatic plants: eucalyptol. Fitoterapia 2002;73:269-75.
Silva J, Abebe W, Sousa SM, et al. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of essential oils of Eucalyptus. J Ethnopharmacol 2003;89:277-83.
White RD, Swick RA, Cheeke PR. Effects of microsomal enzyme induction on the toxicity of pyrrolizidine (Senecio) alkaloids. J Toxicol Environ Health 1983;12:633-40.
Unger M, Frank A. Simultaneous determination of the inhibitory potency of herbal extracts on the activity of six major cytochrome P450 enzymes using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and automated online extraction. Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom 2004;18:2273-81.
Electronic Code of Federal Regulations. Title 21. Part 182 -- Substances Generally Recognized As Safe. Available at: http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=ecfr&sid= 786bafc6f6343634fbf79fcdca7061e1&rgn=div5&view= text&node=21:3.0.1.1.13&idno=21
 

 

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