Well-Being Weight Loss

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Well-Being Weight Loss : This biocompatible complex is comprised of a synergy of plants contributing to weight loss....

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Green Tea

What is Green Tea?

Green tea is a product made from the Camellia sinensis plant. It can be prepared as a beverage, which can have some health effects. Or an “extract” can be made from the leaves to use as medicine.
 
Green tea is used to improve mental alertness and thinking.
 
It is also used for weight loss and to treat stomach disorders, vomiting, diarrhea, headaches, bone loss (osteoporosis), and solid tumor cancers.
 
Some people use green tea to prevent various cancers, including breast cancer, prostate cancer, colon cancer, gastric cancer, lung cancer, solid tumor cancers and skin cancer related to exposure to sunlight. Some women use green tea to fight human papilloma virus (HPV), which can cause genital warts, the growth of abnormal cells in the cervix (cervical dysplasia), and cervical cancer.
 
Green tea is also used for Crohn’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, diseases of the heart and blood vessels, diabetes, low blood pressure, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), dental cavities (caries), kidney stones, and skin damage.
 
Instead of drinking green tea, some people apply green tea bags to their skin to soothe sunburn and prevent skin cancer due to sun exposure. Green tea bags are also used to decrease puffiness under the eyes, as a compress for tired eyes or headache, and to stop gums from bleeding after a tooth is pulled.
 
Green tea in candy is used for gum disease.
 
Green tea is used in an ointment for genital warts. Do not confuse green tea with oolong tea or black tea. Oolong tea and black tea are made from the same plant leaves used to make green tea, but they are prepared differently and have different medicinal effects. Green tea is not fermented at all. Oolong tea is partially fermented, and black tea is fully fermented.
 
The effectiveness ratings for GREEN TEA are as follows:
 
A genuine slimming aid with tonic properties, green tea effectively combats various types of general or localized weight problems. Green tea can thus be recommended to facilitate elimination of water by the kidneys, increase energy expenditure and favour the oxidation of lipids, particularly when accompanied by temporary tiredness. In addition, green tea is known to facilitate the use of fats stored in the body through the effects of theine.
 
Decreasing high levels of fat, like cholesterol and triglycerides, in the blood (hyperlipidemia).
 
 
How does it work?
 
The useful parts of green tea are the leaf bud, leaf, and stem. Green tea is not fermented and is produced by steaming fresh leaves at high temperatures. During this process, it is able to maintain important molecules called polyphenols, which seem to be responsible for many of the benefits of green tea.
 
Polyphenols might be able to prevent inflammation and swelling, protect cartilage between the bones, and lessen joint degeneration. They also seem to be able to fight human papilloma virus (HPV) infections and reduce the growth of abnormal cells in the cervix (cervical dysplasia). Research cannot yet explain how this works.
 
Green tea contains 2% to 4% caffeine, which affects thinking and alertness, increases urine output, and may improve the function of brain messengers important in Parkinson’s disease. Caffeine is thought to stimulate the nervous system, heart, and muscles by increasing the release of certain chemicals in the brain called “neurotransmitters.”
 
Antioxidants and other substances in green tea might help protect the heart and blood vessels.
 
 
Green tea for weight loss? The miracle natural solution? 
 
 
Green coffee extract has been acclaimed as a “miracle” natural product for weight loss, but studies shows and claim that miracles don’t come in pills or capsule form. Till yet you have seen all about green tea weight loss and green tea diet. But, why should we have all these information? With all the new stats about green tea, we want to give weight loss that will surely help you to achieve your dreamed shape. Without any doubt that green tea is healthy for you especially when drank without sugar and milk, but exactly how effective is green tea for your weight loss? Let’s check out.

Effective Weight Loss with Organic Green Tea

With organic green tea, it has many health benefits as you would not find in any other natural weight loss supplement though the result is a bit slow but it does not have any side effect at all. Along with weight loss, green tea avoid cardiac problems, helps to control cholesterol level, as well as helps to fight with dental cavities and lots more. Drinking green tea also burns more calories than just taking caffeine tablets and pills as your body has to cool down the hot drink after it is consumed which burns more energy. You can substantially lose weight if you drink enough green tea on a regularly.

Health and Weight Loss Benefits of Green Tea

Green tea contains Theophylline, amino acids, Polyphenols vitamins and minerals as well as trace elements including iron, sodium and potassium. Theophylline induces metabolism and reduces the want to overeat of food which leads to weight loss.There ar many alternative forms of tea is used and enjoyed for various reasons however once it involves a weight loss supplement their ar many tea that ar extremely acknowledged for his or her weight loss edges. tea is that the most usual tea that individuals accompany weight loss. It turns the metabolism up a notch, suppresses appetence and helps to stabilize blood glucose. This suggests you may consume fewer calories than usual however are going to be burning off additional calories at the same time that is bound to assist you shift any additional weight. It’s suggested for max results that you simply consume five cups of tea daily.

For Quick and Organic Weight Loss Try Kou Tea

 

One of the most appreciated weight loss green teas is China’s Oolong which can be found in the ingredients of Kou Tea . As in same implies as organic Green tea however with its higher caffeine content it stimulates the body’s metabolism even a lot of. Kou tea helps to boost digestion notably of fat, to possess this during a blend with 100 percent organic tea is what you actually wish. Like alternative inexperienced teas, five cups daily area unit counseled to reap the advantages of Organic Kou tea.

 
Green Tea

http://health.yahoo.net/experts/skintype/3-ways-green-tea-good-skin

3 Ways Green Tea Is Good For Skin

By Leslie Baumann, M.D.
Oct 07, 2010

Whether you sip it, slather it on topically, or take it in supplement form, green tea is a powerhouse ingredient in skin care. Here are three benefits of green tea you may not have known about.

Acne

Last year, a University of Miamistudy showed that applying a two percent green tea lotion twice a day for six weeks reduced the number of acne lesions in subjects by more than 58 percent. Green tea contains phytochemicals that are proven to reduce inflammation, which is likely   the reason behind this anti-inflammatory effect.

Skin Cancer 

Multiple findings suggest that green tea has anticarcinogenic effects. Studies in mice have found that green tea inhibits the growth of tumors, and this may work in humans, too. We have heard many times that individuals who drink green tea frequently have a lower rate of gastric and other types of cancer, however, this has not been conclusively proven. As far as skin goes, much research suggests that using a topical treatment with green tea extracts before sun exposure disrupts a mechanism that can lead to skin cancer. In fact, sunscreens containing green tea have been shown to help reduce redness that occurs after sun exposure. In my opinion, there is a plethora of evidence to show that green tea has a protective effect on skin.

Antiaging

Green tea is extremely high in antioxidants, which protect the body against damaging free radicals—a major factor in premature aging. Green tea can also prevent lipid damage and reduce inflammation, which further increases its antiaging properties. Be aware, though, that the purported benefits of green tea are largely preventative—drinking it won’t turn back the clock, but it will keep you looking younger for longer.

There’s more than one way to get your green tea fix. Try combining different sources to get maximum benefits, and follow these guidelines:

·         Make sure topical products look brown; if they don’t, it means they don’t contain enough green tea to be effective.

·         Heat water for green tea until just below the boiling point—if the water’s too hot, the tea will taste bitter. Watch out! Tea is a diuretic so too much can lead to frequent bathroom trips. Large amounts can also make you more likely to bruise.

·         If you don’t like the taste of green tea, try a supplement like Dr. Brandt Antioxidant Water Booster. A dropper full is equal to 15 cups!

Do you know if your skin is at an increased risk of wrinkling?  Find out by taking the free questionnaire at www.SkinTypeSolutions.com/.

Wishing you great skin!

http://www.healthaliciousness.com/blog/How-much-does-green-tea-lower-cholesterol.php

How Much Does Green Tea Lower My Cholesterol?

Is green tea a cholesterol medicine?

A hot cup of green tea imparts a grassy flavor, gives your body a warm feeling, relaxes you, provides anti-oxidants to prevent damage from free radicals, and now, can even lower your cholesterol.
Research shows that drinking up to 10 cups of green tea a day has a significant impact on your blood cholesterol levels.1 Green tea lowers your bad cholesterol (LDL cholesterol) while leaving your good cholesterol (HDL) untouched. But by how much will green tea lower your cholesterol? How much protection does green tea offer from heart disease?

For every glass of green tea you drink you can expect a reduction of 0.015 milli-mols per liter (mmol/L), or 0.58 milli-grams per deciliter (mg/dL).2 That can be a little hard to grasp, so here is a graph to represent green tea's effect on your blood cholesterol levels:

The Bottom Line with Green Tea and Cholesterol

While green tea can help lower your cholesterol, it will not so greatly affect your numbers as to quickly pull you out of the high risk zones. Different foods will have a different affect on everyone. The best way to test if green tea works for you is to buy a cholesterol test kithttps://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=health0225-20&l=ur2&o=1, then test your cholesterol numbers before and after 1 month of drinking green tea every day.

If you are looking to lower your cholesterol, you should drink green tea in combination with avoiding high cholesterol foods, and also, adopting some form of daily exercise. For further reading see the article on foods which lower cholesterol.


Read more at http://www.healthaliciousness.com/blog/How-much-does-green-tea-lower-cholesterol.php#43KJClLgp94V3wZG.99

 
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